Reuters, 27 Sep 2016

Scientists create building inspection robot
Reuters International, 27 Sep

QuicaBot is a new building inspection robot designed to do the job of its human counterpart in half the time. Common building defects include cracks and unevenness in walls, ceilings, and floors. QuicaBot uses a thermal infrared camera and uploads 3D data of the defects to a cloud storage system. Its makers say a major advantage over human building inspectors is that QuicaBot can work non-stop for 36 hours, and takes just two hours to charge. The project’s leader is Asst Prof Erdal Kayacan at Singapore’s NTU. He said their aim is not to replace the manual inspection but to automate the inspection process which can be tedious and repetitive to human inspectors. “In this way, the manual inspector can focus on more sophisticated problems,” he said.

– Also reported on Malaymail online and Myanmar ITV.  

– Initiated by CCO. Browse previous coverage.

Quicabot on Reuters

The New Paper, 8 Oct, page 18

Roving Bot Inspector
The New Paper, 8 Oct, page 18 (full-page infographic with photo of Asst Prof Kayacan)

New buildings may soon see a high-tech building inspector that can spot the tiniest defects. Named Quicabot, it was created by scientists from NTU, in collaboration with JTC and CtrlWorks. Asst Prof Erdal Kayacan, the project leader from NTU MAE said the aim is to speed up and automate the inspection process according to BCA standards. The Quicabot has features such as a thermal camera to detect hollow tiles and walls, a RGB camera to detect cracks and inclinometer to check the level of the ground and a laser scanner to check the evenness and alignment of the walls.

The Straits Times, page B7

This building inspector misses nothing

The Straits Times, page B7, and online

The QuicaBot can do a quicker and more accurate job of inspecting a building for defects than humans, saving time and manpower. Invented by scientists from NTU and co-developed with national industrial developer JTC and local start-up CtrlWorks, the human-height robot can move about by itself to scan a room for defects. A regular inspection that takes one day with two human inspectors could be done in half a day with one human inspector and QuicaBot. Unlike humans, QuicaBot does not get tired and can run for 36 hours after two hours of charging. “Our aim is not to replace the human inspectors, but instead we are trying to make the inspection autonomous, more reliable and faster,” said the project leader, Assistant Professor Erdal Kayacan, from NTU’s School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. The cost of developing the robot is comparable to an inspector’s annual salary, said the co-principal investigator, Professor Chen I-Ming. But it is too early to talk about commercial costs as the model could take various forms such as leasing or service provision, he added.

The Straits Times online, 21 Sep 2016

New Singapore robot could make building inspections a breeze

The Straits Times online, 21 Sep

With laser scanners and cameras, a new robot can inspect a building for defects faster and more accurately than humans, saving time and manpower. Invented by scientists from NTU and co-developed with national industrial developer JTC and local start-up CtrlWorks, the robot can move about by itself to scan a room for defects. A regular inspection that takes one day with two human inspectors could be completed in half a day with one human inspector and the QuicaBot.

TODAY online, 21 Sep 2016

Robot invented by NTU scientists to help speed up building inspection

TODAY online, 21 Sep

Meet QuicaBot, which has a special talent in finding fault. This new robot, invented by a group of four scientists from NTU, is able to inspect indoor spaces using laser scanners and high-tech cameras, to help detect defects and uneven surfaces faster and more thoroughly than humans. Accompanied by a human inspector, it can finish checking a 200 sq m room in 20 minutes, compared to the 45 minutes two building inspectors may spend to do the same. Calling this a laudable initiative by NTU, BCA said that the QuicaBot was developed based on the internal finish assessment standard of its Construction Quality Assessment System (Conquas).

The New Paper, page 5

Move over new building, inspector bot is here

The New Paper, page 5

New buildings in Singapore may soon have a high-tech building inspector rolling up to their door steps armed with laser scanners and high-tech cameras that can spot the tiniest cracks and defects. Named QuicaBot – short for Quality Inspection and Assessment Robot – it can move autonomously to scan a room in about half the time taken for manual inspection, using high-tech cameras and laser scanners to pick up building defects like cracks and uneven surfaces. This new building inspector is a robot invented by scientists from NTU, co-developed with Singapore’s national industrial developer JTC and local start-up CtrlWorks. Professor Chen I-Ming, Director of the NTU Robotic Research Centre and co-leader of the project, said the robot has already done well in simulated environments.

The Business Times, page 3

JTC to trial robot for building inspection

The Business Times, page 3 and online

Early next year, a Wall-E lookalike autonomous robot will be deployed in an almost-completed industrial project in Singapore’s west to check for architectural defects. And if the trial, undertaken by Singapore’s industrial developer JTC, proves successful, it can take over some aspects of the job currently done by humans in the near future. Named QuicaBot, short for Quality Inspection and Assessment Robot, and armed with its high-tech cameras and laser scanners, it can help detect if walls meet at right angles or floors are even. QuicaBot is the culmination of a year’s work for scientists from NTU. At the current phase, the cost of the robot is about the annual salary of a human inspector, said Chen I-Ming, director of the NTU Robotic Research Centre.

MyPaper, page A7

JTC uses robot to spot building flaws

MyPaper, page A7

Singapore’s JTC will deploy a robot in a trial to help look for defects in an almost completed project early next year, with the aim of replacing some aspects of human inspection in near future. QuicaBot is the culmination of a year’s work for scientists from NTU. At the current phase, the cost of the robot is about the annual salary of a human inspector, said Chen I-Ming, director of the NTU Robotic Research Centre.

Lianhe Zaobao, page 12

Robotic inspector invented by NTU scientists speeds up building checks

Lianhe Zaobao, page 12

New buildings in Singapore may soon be inspected by a high-tech robot armed with laser scanners and cameras capable of spotting the tiniest cracks and defects. It was invented by scientists from NTU, and co-developed with Singapore’s national industrial developer JTC and local start-up CtrlWorks for over a year. The robot uses laser scanner and a camera to detect the cracks. The robot takes a full scan of the area, essentially mapping it in digital 3D. It can also upload data on defects spotted, integrating this with existing digital models of the building. Asst Prof Erdal Kayacan from NTU’s School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering says that this robot only needs to be charged for two hours but can operate for three days.

MyPaper, page B2

Robot will tell you if the walls or floor are even

MyPaper, page B2

NTU scientists developed an automated robot that helps developers to quickly inspect new buildings for cracks on ceilings and walls, and unevenness in the floor and walls. The job which takes two inspectorscan now be done in about half the time by a human inspector and the robot. Project leader Asst Prof Erdal Kayacan from NTU MAE said that the Quality Inspection and Assessment Robot (QuicaBot), a new helper for the construction industry, can operate for three days with just two hours of charging. The robot is invented by scientists from NTU, co-developed with Singapore’s national industrial developer JTC and local start-up CtrlWorks.

Channel NewsAsia, 21 Sep 2016, 10pm

Robot inspector for buildings

Channel NewsAsia, 21 Sep, 10pm

Robots could soon be used for inspection of some buildings in Singapore, with laser scanners and cameras, they can spot the tiniest and defects. Called the “Quality Inspection and Assessment Robot” – or QuicaBot and can perform with accuracy supposedly better than humans. Small and mobile, the Quicabot can scan a room in mere minutes. Nothing escapes their attention and they don’t make mistakes either, like humans. They are able to meet or even exceed standards set by the BCA. “Our aim is not to replace the human inspectors, but instead we are trying to make the inspection autonomous, more reliable and faster,” said the project leader, Assistant Professor Erdal Kayacan, from NTU’s School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. It was invented by scientists from NTU, and co-developed with Singapore’s national industrial developer JTC and local start-up CtrlWorks for over a year.

938 Live, 21 Sep, 12pm

NTU invents new building inspection robot

938 Live, 21 Sep, 12pm

New buildings in Singapore may soon be inspected by a high-tech robot armed with laser scanners and cameras capable of spotting the tiniest cracks and defects. It was invented by scientists from NTU, and co-developed with Singapore’s national industrial developer JTC and local start-up CtrlWorks for over a year. The robot uses laser scanner and a camera to detect the cracks. Assistant Professor Erdal Kayacan, from NTU’s School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, said it is believed to be the first such attempt in the region to build a robot specifically for the requirements of building inspection and it is able to meet BCA standards. The robot only needs to be charged for two hours but can operate for three days, and can make building inspection autonomous, more reliable and faster.

Capital 958FM Chinese Radio News, 21 Sep, 6pm and 7pm

Local scientists invent new building inspection robot

Capital 958FM Chinese Radio News, 21 Sep, 6pm and 7pm

Local scientists has invented a new building inspection robot, which can detect defects in new buildings with greater accuracy, saving manpower and time. Called the “Quality Inspection and Assessment Robot”, it is invented by scientists from NTU, co-developed with Singapore’s national industrial developer JTC and local start-up CtrlWorks in a year. Prof Chen I-Ming, director of the NTU Robotic Research Centre said the robot will reduce time needed by half as compared to manual inspection and can record 3D scans of the entire room.

Channel NewsAsia online, 21 Sep 2016

Robotic inspector to speed up building checks
Channel NewsAsia online, 21 Sep

New buildings in Singapore may soon be inspected by a high-tech robot armed with laser scanners and cameras capable of spotting the tiniest cracks and defects. Named the “Quality Inspection and Assessment Robot” – or QuicaBot, it was invented by scientists from NTU, and co-developed with Singapore’s national industrial developer JTC and local start-up CtrlWorks for over a year. The robot can move autonomously to scan a room in minutes, using an array of sensors and cameras. The key aim is to automate and speed up the building inspection process according to standards set by the BCA, said Project Leader from NTU’s School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Assistant Prof Erdal Kayacan.
– Also reported by Mediacorp Berita.

Shin Min Daily News, 21 Sep, page 3

Robotic inspector which is invented by NTU scientists speeds up building check

Shin Min Daily News, 21 Sep, page 3

New buildings in Singapore may soon be inspected by a high-tech robot armed with laser scanners and cameras capable of spotting the tiniest cracks and defects. This cuts down the manpower needed for this job and also cuts the time required into half. It was invented by scientists from NTU, and co-developed with Singapore’s national industrial developer JTC and local start-up CtrlWorks. The robot uses laser scanner and camera to detect the cracks. The robot takes a full scan of the area, essentially mapping it in digital 3D. It can also upload data on defects spotted, integrating this with existing digital models of the building.

The Stack, 21 Sep 2016

Robot inspector to assess building quality in Singapore

The Stack, 21 Sep

A team of robotics researchers has developed a high-tech robot to speed up building inspection and assessment processes in Singapore. The robot, armed with laser scanners and cameras, has been built to detect the smallest of cracks and defects in a building’s structure. Named Quality Inspection and Assessment Robot, or QuicaBot, the machine was created by engineers from NTU, alongside local industrial developer JTC and startup CtrlWorks. Project lead, mechanical and aerospace engineer Erdal Kayacan noted that the main goal of the research is to automate and speed up building inspection in line with standards set by the BCA. ‘Visual inspection of a new building is an intensive effort that takes two inspectors, so we have designed a robot to assist a human inspector to do his job in about half the time, saving precious time and manpower,’ said Kayacan.

Nanyang Siang Pau, 22 Sep 2016

Robots inspect buildings
Nanyang Siang Pau, 22 Sep

NTU Singapore invented QuicaBot which can scan a house for small cracks and defects, helping to assess whether a building meets standards. The robot is made up of two laser scanners, inclinometer, thermal infrared camera and standard colour camera. The photo shows Asst Prof Erdal Kayacan demonstrating the functions of the robot. The inspection task which originally requires two inspectors can now be completed by one inspector and one robot, saving half the time needed.